Tree Roots Are Active This Month: Protect Your Sewer Lines

Tree Roots Are Active This Month: Protect Your Sewer Lines

36778918_sWith the temperatures outside staying consistently low, most of the wildlife activity tends to slow down. You don’t tend to see much movement from the squirrels and other animals during these cold weather months.
With the cold temperatures outside most people stop mowing their lawns and, only tend to the winter shrubs they have planted in their yards – if any.
But, one things outside that actually has more activity during the winter months is tree roots.
This is not something that most people know, because all of the growing and activity happens below ground. While the leaves and blossoms of all varieties of trees go dormant during the winter months, the tree roots are very active this time of year.
Unfortunately, the inside of your sewer lines contains all of the nutrients and water that a tree needs to survive. And, if the roots find this source of food, they will move right into the pipe. This can cause a serious clog and may even break your sewer line.
Here are some ways that you can keep tree roots from growing into your sewer line:
• Be thoughtful of where you plant trees in your yard. Don’t plant trees on top of where you sewer line is buried. The closer the trees are to the sewer line, the easier it is for them to locate your sewer lines.
• Have your sewer lines camera-inspected at least once per year to identify where tree roots are and, how close they are to growing into your sewer line. If you monitor them regularly, you can develop a plan of attack for prevention, rather than getting surprised by a sewer clog.
• Talk with your plumbing professional about what kinds of chemicals you can put in the sewer system to discourage tree roots. There are some environments that tree roots will not grow towards – even if there is a source of nutrients there for them.
All year around, trees need water and nutrients to keep their root system healthy and, maintain the strength of their foundation. But, during the winter months, water and nutrients are scarce. So, tree roots tend to look further than normal for sustenance. Make sure your sewer line is not their source of food by following these tips.