Underground Utility Myths – Debunked!

Underground Utility Myths – Debunked!

36189401_sSummer is the one time of the year when you can count on good weather (mostly), and can plan outdoor projects without having to worry about a storm rolling in and halting the process. Having your plumbing system repaired or replaced is a major project and having it done in good weather takes one more point of stress off the list.
For a majority of circumstances, a trenchless approach to repairing or replacing plumbing lines is the best. It avoids needing to dig long trenches on your property and tear up your landscaping. However, there is some digging and drilling that happen with a trenchless repair, which means that any utility lines that are buried on your property are at risk. Here are some myths about underground utilities for you to make sure your chosen trenchless contractor is aware of:
Assuming where the utilities are buried is just as good as knowing. When utilities are installed, the lines must rise and fall with the landscape. This means that the depth they are buried varies because the surface grade changes. It is absolutely not safe to assume the depth of where utilities are buried.
It won’t happen to me. No matter how good of a trenchless contractor one is, utility strikes happen every day and without intention. Cutting corners or hurrying to finish a job can lead to significant consequences. A trenchless contractor must be paying attention at all times, no matter how many jobs he or she has completed.
It is not my responsibility. When a trenchless contractor calls the utility company to discuss the location of any utilities buried in the area where he or she is working, it is the responsibility of both parties to be explicit and accurate in the information they are relaying. Both parties must work together to safely locate utilities so that no unneeded damage is done.
When you are researching a trenchless contractor, make sure to discuss with them some of these myths and ask their feedback. Trenchless digs are designed to be less invasive and less costly than traditional trench digging, but this will not be the case if a utility is struck and damaged during the job.